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After the last TT was produced in November 2023, an even greater icon with the Four Rings is driving off into the proverbial sunset. The final R8 has rolled off the assembly line at the Audi Böllinger Höfe site in Heilbronn, Germany. The supercar’s epilogue is a Vegas Yellow coupe in the Performance Quattro Edition with a carbon fiber exterior package and 20-inch wheels.

Audi had to extend production of the R8 to keep up with an influx of customer orders that came following the company’s announcement about killing the flagship sports car. Originally, the last car was supposed to be built at the end of 2023 but that didn’t happen until this month. Last year, sales went up by 49 percent, reaching 1,591 units. However, the R8 was still by far the slowest-selling global product.

Looking back at sales results, demand for the R8 has always been low, which is understandable given the car’s exorbitant price tag. Demand peaked in 2008 when Audi shipped 5,016 cars to customers. These sales numbers take into consideration both the Coupe and Spyder flavors.

Year Sales
2023 1,591
2022 1,068
2021 1,887
2020 1,651
2019 1,944
2018 2,760
2017 3,068
2016 2,878
2015 2,191
2014 2,222
2013 2,595
2012 2,536
2011 3,349
2010 3,166
2009 3,074
2008 5,016
2007 2,952

The demise of the Audi R8 means Volkswagen Group’s venerable V10 engine is one foot in the grave. Lamborghini will phase out the R8’s sister car, the Huracan, later this year. The remaining production run has been accounted for. It effectively means you can’t order a supercar with the naturally aspirated 5.2-liter mill anymore. The Huracan has consistently been the more popular of the two mid-engined supercars, which probably explains why only Lamborghini will introduce a successor this year.

In June 2023, Lamborghini said it was making so much money that it has the necessary funds for the development of the new model without sharing costs with Audi. The follow-up to the Huracan is expected to be a Lambo through and through but with a plug-in hybrid setup featuring a downsized gasoline engine. The ICE is reportedly a twin-turbo V8 believed to work as an NA engine until 7,000 rpm when forced induction is said to kick in.

While Lamborghini is gearing up to launch a new model with a bull’s name, Audi doesn’t intend to launch a direct successor. Now and then, company officials hint at an all-electric replacement, but it’s likely not coming anytime soon. We do know the high-revving V10 is dead for good. Blame it on the R8’s steep asking price and increasingly stringent emissions regulations.

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